Fine Fescue Lawns

Description:

Fine Fescue is an adaptable grass type that does well in a wide variety of climatic conditions. Fine Fescues are moderately tolerant of shade. Consequently, It is often used on blends for shady areas. Thereare four grass types that are commonly called “fine Fescue”. These are Creeping Red Fescue, Chewing Fescue, Hard Fescue. and Sheep Fescue

Fine Fescues have a low tolerance for traffic and wear. They tend to grow in clumps, giving them less of a refined look than other lawn grasses. Consequenlty, they are often overlooked as a lawn grass.

Fine Fescue Sheep Fescue
Sheep Fescue - USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database / Britton, N.L., and A. Brown. 1913. An illustrated flora of the northern United States, Canada and the British Possessions. Vol. 1: 271

Nevertheless, they will “green up” areas that are shady or have other adverse conditions. Typically, they are usually blended with other cold weather grasses. Fine fescues are known to grow in areas that are cold, windy and dry. Subsequently, these grasses will typically survive challenging conditions. In contrast to grasses that would be challenged by the same. Fine Fescues are used in blends aimed at shady areas. They can be used to strengthen the turf in the shady areas beneath trees.

All of the fescues share some common characteristics, Shade Tolerance, Resistance to Drought and staying green all year. Comparitively, the fine fescues are more resistant to cold and shade then the other varieties. Although they have some desireable traits, you will rarely find a lawn that consists entirely of a fine fescue grass.

Characteristics:

Traffic Tolerance Low Traffic Tolerance
Type Cool Weather Grass
Acidity PH 5.5-6.5
Maintenance Low/Medium Maintenance
Fertilizer  Commercially Available “Lawn Fertilizers”
Growth Rate Slow
Light Full Sun to Partial Shade
Watering  Regular Watering (Do not Overwater)
Mowing Height 2 to 3”
Propogation   Seed
Salt Tolerance Moderate (With Exception of Hard Fescue which is high)
Best USDA Zones 3-4-5-6-7


USDA Information on Chewing Fescue

USDA Information on Hard Fescue